10 Cool Coworking Spaces

CoCo

Location: Minneapolis
Cost: Memberships start at $50 a month.
LiquidSpace CEO Mark Gilbreath callsCoCo “a dramatic one-of-a-kind workspace.” He’s got that right. CoCo is a 16,000-square-foot, sunlit space that makes use of the architecturally-interesting and historic trading floor once used by the Minneapolis Grain Exchange. Now instead of traders yelling bids and waving arms around, the place is serene—khaki or jeans-clad entrepreneurs work quietly at their laptops while Pandora plays softly in the background. There’s a concierge who makes sure coffee and pastries are well-stocked and will order you lunch and introduce new members to others.

pariSoma

Location: San Francisco
Cost: Memberships range from $100 to $545 a month.
The mix of creative workspace, events, classes (over 175 in 2011), and advisors from places like Andreesen Horowitz, Blue Run Ventures and Twilio give pariSoma members a rewarding work experience. The space features a wrap-around mezzanine with permanent desks that look over the main area, and more flexible, open space. Other cool factors: A hanging casing of a 737 jet airplane, a vintage Bell Atlantic phone booth, and a couple of Google bikes for coworkers to use. The pariSoma facility is used by more than 120 members and 60 companies, most of which are tech start-ups. PariSoma is owned and operated by faberNovel, a consulting company that helps big companies think and act like small start-ups.

Oficio

Location: Boston
Cost: Monthly memberships start at $99, but you can also get space by the day or week.
Oficio is a boutique shared office and coworking space located in the center of the vibrant and historic Back Bay neighborhood in Boston. By day, Oficio hosts a diverse group of freelancers and entrepreneurs as a coworking space, and by night transforms into a multifunctional event space. It is footsteps away from the Boston Public Garden and Arlington T station. It opened only three months ago and already has 60 members.

Hera Hub

Location: San Diego
Cost: Memberships start at $69 for eight hours a month and go up to $369 for 80 hours.
This spa-like coworking space is different because it’s only for women and includes feminine touches such as soft lighting, fountains, candles, relaxing music, inspirational quotes on the walls and chair massages every Tuesday afternoon. The women-only angle seems to be getting some traction; in only four months Hera Hub already has more than 100 female-owned businesses working from the space. Felena Hanson says she created Hera Hub because she believes that women interact differently than men and are instinctively more collaborative in their approach to business.

Gangplank

Location: Chandler, AZ
Cost: Free, but you have to work for it
Gangplank lets people use its coworking space and conference room for free. Instead of paying to work there, users pay with their time and help out with projects mostly handed down from the city government. Full-time members who use a permanent desk do more, such as writing blog posts, cleaning up after events and organizing the work space. Not a bad deal if you’re really strapped for cash. And the idea is catching on: Phoenix and Tucson will soon be getting Gangplanks of their own.

Coffee & Power

Locations: San Francisco and Santa Monica
Cost: Free, but you have to work for it.
This coworking space is free to use—the only requirement is that members need to be active in its online exchanges for services, similar to how TaskRabbit works. In addition to providing a physical place to work, Coffee & Power posts “missions” that buyers and sellers can help each other with. Another thing adding to the cool factor here is the investor roster, which includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman. A third location will soon be popping up in Portland, Oregon.

Flip-Work

Location: Los Angeles
Cost: Membership is $200 a month.
This newly renovated shared office space is in the heart of downtown LA near Pershing Square Park with parking and a Metro station across the street. And according to SharedDesks, a coworking site finder, Flip-Work knows the value of making work fun. It includes a “Decompression Room” with pool, air hockey, and foosball tables as well as a rooftop bar and restaurant.

Miami Shared

Locations: Miami
Cost: Memberships start at $50 a month.
While you may not think of Miami as a hotspot for tech start-ups, this coworking space is doing everything it can to foster an environment of innovation there, starting with offering memberships for as low as $150 for three months. When it opened two years ago it let local tech groups use its space for meet-ups without charge. Now that it has 60 members made up of small tech start-ups, creative professionals and new media, it hosts workshops, speaking events, and networking mixers to grow the Miami tech community. Other kinds of entrepreneurs—such as lawyers, financial advisers, and real estate brokers—also like to hang out here because of the coworking vibe.

Grind

Locations: New York City
Cost: Rent space by the day ($35) or by the month ($500).
Grind encourages collaboration in both its physical and digital spaces. Each of its 300 members has a profile online that lists what they can do, what kind of help they need and contact information. The physical space is also high-tech and sustainable. A wave of a membership card opens a member’s locker or broadcasts a portfolio on the monitors. And its Tru-stile doors are made out of 82 percent post-industrial waste and the faucets use 30 percent less water.

Blueline

Location: Bloomington, IN
Cost: Memberships are available by the month ($300), week ($100) or day ($20).
Blueline is a creative design and media house that specializes in web, photography and video production. But owner Chelsea Sanders doesn’t want to work alone and has opened her space to others, including programmers, copywriters, and artists. According to DeskHero, it has a unique boutique style and great lighting, excellent music and interesting people. Notable members include clothing company Dope Couture and fashion writer Jessica Quirk. Blueline also holds movie nights for members and hosts monthly art shows to support local artists.

 

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Meridith Dennes is a co-founder and the CEO of Project Eve LLC, a leading women's lifestyle media company online including some of the web's best loved communities including the eponymous Project Eve, Getting Balance, Project Eve Moms, Project Eve Money and Scary Puppy Silly Kitty. With a digital readership in excess of 20+ million monthly uniques, and over 1 million social media followers, Project Eve provides the news and resources to inspire and empower women. Meridith also works as a digital consultant and social media strategist and has worked with several Fortune 500 companies to help increase brand awareness and improve social media engagement.Meridith holds a BA from Northwestern University and an MBA from NYU's Stern School of Business. Prior to founding Project Eve, she spent 15 years working in investment banking. Meridith currently lives in Vermont with her husband and 2 daughters and spends her free time teaching skiing, practicing yoga, hiking and snowshoeing.