7 Traits of a good Networker

Traits of a good Networker.

Networking made FUN
Networking made FUN

Have you ever wondered how a friend gets the inside scoop on the latest bargain, where you can service your car for a great deal or have landed that job before its ever advertised.

The answer is great relationship building and networking skills. So if you are looking to manifest that dream project or planning to change your career direction then good networking habits are a must.

Over the next 7 days I will share what I believe are 7 traits which will help cultivate great habits and increase your support network.

 Trait 1. They have a ” Little Black Book “.

Great Networkers have a “ Little Black Book “ or database of contacts and regularly create situations to add new people. Not everyone is blessed with a good memory for names and people so if you are not lucky enough to have a memory like a safe be organised and set up a physical database.

To create a list of possible contacts start with the easy ones: family friends, relatives, former employees, former co-workers, former schools friends. Facebook and Linked In can be a great source of assistance.

Then take this out another layer: volunteer activities, your hairdresser, the local store, your kids school friends.

Then take it out again into the third zone by attending free talks, seminars, marketing events or community meetings etc.  Networking has no boundaries, always have a business card or expect to get one, good networkers have the flexibility to connect in any situation.

To get the best out of the any event.

Introduce yourself to at least 3 people and get their cards. When you get home add the card to your database and make some notes re the connection, this will help when you meet them again.

DO: Make these genuine contacts and ask about why they are at the event, you might be able to help them and out of the conversation a new connection may be formed.

If the event is over lunch try and go to lunch with someone you have met this gives an opportunity to talk about what you have learnt and again establishes a relationship.

DON’T: Jump to give or get a card without investing in a genuine conversation.

Make sure you ask questions about them and listen, wait till they ask about you and if you have listened you should be able to expand on any common points.

Its not a race so pay attention to people, giving out 30 cards with no connection you may as well have stood on a street corner outside a bank.

Once you have your database you may have the opportunity to share things which benefit some of your contacts.

EG: You know of a local tradesman who is reliable, honest and goes that extra mile. You may pop his details on your facebook, share his business details via LinkedIn or even pop an email out to contacts within the local area saying heads up this guy is great if you even need some building repairs.

Get into the habit of sharing and giving as it creates a foundation for future relationships. If you can help others or be the first to step up with support this increases the chance that if you ask for suggestions, tips or guidance people may step in and help you.

In Summary,

Two of the best networkers I know are also two of the most supportive people to others, there is a karmic energy to networking : be generous in your assistance and support of others, be genuine in the connections you make and honest in your intentions. You attract what you give out.

Tomorrow we look at trait number 2: Great networkers have a plan.

I wish you luck and just think of the exciting possibilities in the conversations that are in your future.

Lisa

About the Author.

Lisa Blades is Executive Coach for a boutique agency Phoenix Executive Coaching. She loves helping people manifest their dreams and take control back of their career.

To view other blogs by Lisa please visit, Executive ZAP http://phoenixexecutivecoaching.com/latest-news/executive-zap

6 COMMENTS

  1. As an owner of a women’s networking group I applaud this post!! It is right on. On a side note, nothing NOTHING bothers me more than someone giving me their card before they even know me or if I would be a potential lead. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Great post. I sit on a board for a young professional organization. I’ve been an active member of the board since its inception. During our luncheons or seminars, I always make it a point to seek out the new members and make them feel welcomed. I rarely give out my card unless I’m asked for one, and I always listen. You never know when you may need to pull that new contact out of the “network hat”.

  3. Thanks Andrew. I love that you take that approach as it has warmth and is genuine. Good luck with your organisation.

  4. Thanks Robin. I am always looking for opportunities to help people and 90% of the time the experience is organic and a real connection make a great contact. Have a great week and I wish you success with your group.

  5. This is tremendously helpful, thank you for posting this article! I need help in the networking department, as I have to learn how to be a good networker starting my own business and all…